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Misleading
misleading

CLAIM ID

a1d371dc

Scott Atlas was included in the Corona Task Force as he frequently downplayed the coronavirus.

Scott Atlas was appointed as a special adviser in the coronavirus taskforce as he has a background in medical science and health care policy.

Scott Atlas was appointed as a special adviser in the coronavirus taskforce as he has a background in medical science and health care policy.On August 10, 2020, Dr. Scott Atlas was appointed to serve as an advisor on the White House Coronavirus Task Force. In many interviews, he advocated a faster reopening of schools and businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic. He claimed that children have zero risks of dying and a very low risk of any severe illness from COVID-19, and children rarely transmit the disease (YouTube: Kusi News and Hoover Institution ). He also argued that people without symptoms should not be tested for the coronavirus and pushed his idea for CDC's August 2020 recommendation. His views and influence on policies have caused controversy on the task force. Director Robert Redfield, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), said that Atlas's views were completely false (NBC News). Dr. Anthony Fauci, one of the task force members, said that Dr. Scott Atlas is sharing misleading information with the President. Atlas also claimed that masks don't work to prevent coronavirus spread, although it is recommended by the CDC. On October 18, 2020, Twitter removed the controversial tweet of Atlas.

Atlas seems to downplay coronavirus. However, we cannot say Trump appointed him for that reason. Moreover, in interviews, Atlas clarified that he has been appointed as a special adviser in the task force since he is a health care policy adviser.

The COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to a lot of potentially dangerous misinformation. For reliable advice on COVID-19 including symptoms, prevention and available treatment, please refer to the World Health Organisation or your national healthcare authority.

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