<img src="https://trc.taboola.com/1321591/log/3/unip?en=page_view" width="0" height="0" style="display:none">
Fact Check Library

Fact Check with Logically.

Download the Free App Today

false
false

CLAIM ID

e24b24fc

COVID-19 vaccines are satanic because they contain the component 'Luciferin.'

COVID-19 vaccines do not contain luciferin or luciferase. They are compounds responsible for bioluminescence.

Some social media posts falsely claim that the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine contains the luciferase enzyme in a 66.6ml solution. According to National Geographic, the compound that generates light in living organisms like fireflies and certain species of jellyfish is known as luciferin. The arrangement of luciferin molecules causes the bioluminescent color.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the Pfizer/BioNTec and Moderna mRNA vaccines for emergency use in December 2020. The vaccines met statutory standards, and their data presented clear evidence that the vaccines may efficiently prevent COVID-19.

The ingredients in the vaccine are disclosed in a fact sheet on FDA's website. Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine contains mRNA, lipids, cholesterol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, tromethamine, tromethamine hydrochloride, acetic acid, sodium acetate, and sucrose. It does not contain luciferin, an organic compound that produces light through oxidation.

Furthermore, none of the other vaccines available from Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, or AstraZeneca contain luciferin.

In July 2020, luciferase enzymes were used by scientists at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston to speed up vaccine development and diagnostic testing. However, the enzyme, in any form, is not a component of COVID-19 vaccines.

The word or name 'Lucifer' has its derivation in Latin, which means light-bringing or morning star. In Christianity, it is the name of the fallen angel or Satan. Light is the core meaning for many similar-sounding words that have roots in Latin. Anti-vaxxers deliberately confuse people by using such words, spreading misinformation about vaccines, and undermining their confidence in vaccination altogether.

The COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to a lot of potentially dangerous misinformation. For reliable advice on COVID-19, including symptoms, prevention, and available treatment, please refer to the World Health Organization or your national healthcare authority.

Have a question or correction?

Please tell us if you think this claim had been misjudged or requires correction by sending us evidence to support your error claim. We will revisit our evidence and verdict and do some additional research to double check if we can verify the new information

Fact Check of the Day

false

2000 mg of Lysine protects against COVID-19.