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CLAIM ID

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Molnupiravir drug as a treatment will induce massive mutation of the COVID-19 virus, eventually killing it.

No conclusive report suggests that Molnupiravir could lead to mutations that kill the virus. Studies suggest it controls the severity of the virus.

Molnupiravir is a Merck oral medication licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for only emergency use in adults with mild-to-moderate COVID-19. FDA considers Molnupiravir as an investigational drug.

FDA explains, "Molnupiravir is a medication that works by introducing errors into the SARS-CoV-2 virus' genetic code, which prevents the virus from further replicating."

According to Yale Medicine, the drug is supposed to be used by an individual who has "experienced COVID-19 symptoms." Albert Shaw, a Yale Medicine infectious diseases specialist, said, "When the drug enters your bloodstream, it blocks the ability of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to replicate."

Further leading to mutations in the RNA, "And when this RNA is translated into viral proteins, these proteins contain too many mutations for the virus to function," Shaw added.

Several professionals have stated their opinions on medicine; few favor it, and a few are concerned. Medical News Today published that there are "concerns that it might cause mutations in host cells,'' when "Molnupiravir causes viral RNA to mutate." Further, it speculated that drug might cause "cancers or birth abnormalities."

Various studies have shown positive results; nevertheless, they must be peer-reviewed before conclusions can be drawn. Medical News Today noted that experts say the drug could be a significant game-changer for the treatment if the trials are successfully accepted.

Indeed the drug works on a mutation basis, but the mutation reduces the virus load in an individual's body. Molnupiravir is not a drug used to kill the virus; it is to help the patients recover and not lead to hospitalization and reduce the severity of the illness.

The COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to a lot of potentially dangerous misinformation. For reliable advice on COVID-19, including symptoms, prevention, and available treatment, please refer to the World Health Organization or your national healthcare authority.

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