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A 90 year old woman was implanted with trackable microchips under the guise of a vaccine.

Margaret Keenan has become the first person to receive the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. She was not implanted with a trackable microchip.

Margaret Keenan, a 90-year-old grandmother, has become the first person in the world to receive the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine outside of a trial. Keenan received the jab at about 6.45am in Coventry, United Kingdom marking the start of a historic mass vaccination programme, according to The Guardian.

The vaccines will be administered at 50 hospital hubs around the U.K., with patients aged 80 and over who are either already attending hospital as an outpatient or are being discharged home after a hospital stay, being first in line. Keenan received the injection from the nurse May Parsons at University hospital and said it was a “privilege”.

Many on social media are claiming that Keenan was implanted with a trackable microchip instead of a vaccine, a conspiracy theory that has been around since June 2020 and has been debunked repeatedly. The theory claims that the coronavirus pandemic is a hoax and a cover for a plan to implant trackable microchips and that the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is behind it. There is no vaccine "microchip" and there is no evidence to support claims that Bill Gates is planning for this in the future. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have also said the claim is false, according to the BBC.

The COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to a lot of potentially dangerous misinformation. For reliable advice on COVID-19 including symptoms, prevention and available treatment, please refer to the World Health Organisation or your national healthcare authority.

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