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CLAIM ID

6f3436cc

The American author Naomi Wolf is a medical doctor.

Wolf acquired the title of "Dr" after completing a Ph.D. The author has spread misinformation on COVID-19 and is not a medical doctor.

An erroneous Twitter post implying Dr Naomi Wolf to be a medical doctor has over 12,000 likes and 5,000 retweets. Wolf, who is not a medical doctor, acquired the prenominal title of "Dr" in 2015 after completing a Doctor of Philosophy in English literature from the University of Oxford.

On June 5, 2021, Twitter suspended Naomi Wolf's account over vaccine misinformation. A former political advisor and author of the bestselling book The Beauty Myth, Wolf, has made several misleading claims about COVID-19 vaccines. Over the last year, she has falsely claimed that vaccines were a "software platform" and that vaccinated people are "toxic." She has described Dr. Anthony Fauci, the chief medical advisor to the US president, as "satan."

Many people took to social media to praise the decision to suspend Wolf's account. However, some have expressed their discomfort. Simone Gold, an anti-vaccine activist with over 200,000 Twitter followers, wrote a misleading claim indicating that Naomi Wolf was a medical doctor. She accused Twitter of suspending the accounts of "doctors, scientists and researchers," including Wolf, for sharing their "professional opinions." However, Wolf is not a medical doctor and acquired the prenominal doctor's title after completing a Doctor of Philosophy.

During the pandemic, Twitter updated its misinformation policy regarding COVID-19. In its blog, the microblogging site said it would remove misleading posts "about the efficacy and/or safety of preventative measures, treatments, or other precautions to mitigate or treat" COVID-19.

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