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Margaret Sanger was a racist who believed in eugenics. Her goal with planned parenthood was to eradicate the minority.

Sanger's views on eugenics have been widely debated, and there is no evidence that she was a racist who wanted to eradicate the minority.

Sanger's views on eugenics have been widely debated, and there is no evidence that she was a racist who wanted to eradicate the minority. Margaret Sanger was a sex educator who opened the first birth control clinic in the United States in 1916. On the second night of the Republican National Convention, Abby Johnson, an anti-abortion activist, said that 'Margaret Sanger was a racist who believed in eugenics. Her goal with Planned Parenthood was to eradicate the minority.'

Eugenics is the widely debunked theory that the human race could be bettered by encouraging people with traits like intelligence and hard work to reproduce. Although she did find some common ground with the people who advocated eugenics, there is no evidence that she was a racist who wanted to eradicate the minority population.

Ms. Sanger's views on race and eugenics have been widely debated. N.P.R. and Washington Post fact-checked similar claims made by Ben Carson in a 2015 interview with Fox News. In the United States, eugenics intersected with the birth control movement in the 1920s, and Ms. Sanger reportedly spoke at eugenics conferences. She also talked about birth control being used to facilitate 'the process of weeding out the unfit and preventing the birth of defectives,' N.P.R. wrote. N.P.R. further added, 'Historians seem to disagree on just how involved in the eugenics movement she was. Some contend her involvement was for political reasons, just to win support for birth control.' Susan Reverby, a health care historian and professor at Wellesley College, said that 'Sanger was enamored and supported some eugenicists' ideas is certainly true' but Sanger's main argument was not eugenics, it was that she 'thought people should have the children they wanted.'

In 1939, Ms. Sanger founded 'the Negro Project,' one of the first major undertakings of the Birth Control Federation of America, a forerunner to Planned Parenthood. It aimed to give Black women control over their own fertility and limit reproduction among poor and uneducated women who could least afford it. The Washington Post noted that Sanger recruited black leaders to support the effort and, in letters to the project’s director, urged that white men who were outsiders should not run the clinics. She said the effort would gain more credibility with greater community involvement. Conservatives have argued that it was a racist effort to reduce the Black population. But, the Washington Post also wrote that there is no evidence that Sanger was a racist and her writings have been taken out of context to suggest she wanted to eradicate the minority.

The Margaret Sanger Papers Project, a New York University initiative to examine Sanger's writings, addressed the project and dismissed such assertions in a 2001 newsletter.

'The Negro Project did not differ very much from the earlier birth control campaigns in the rural South designed to test simpler methods on poor, uneducated and mostly white agricultural communities,' the papers project wrote. 'Following these other efforts in the South, it would have been more racist, in Sanger's mind, to ignore African-Americans in the South than to fail to raise the health and economic standards of their communities.'

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