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"Cow dung therapy" can trigger Mucormycosis infection.

There is no established correlation between cow dung and Mucormycosis. However, black fungus is caused by the mucormycetes found in animal dung.

There is no established correlation between cow dung and Mucormycosis. However, black fungus is caused by the mucormycetes found in animal dung.With the onset of the second wave of COVID-19, Indian men in Gujarat covered their bodies with cow dung, believing it would protect them against COVID-19. Several doctors warned against the use, reasoning that it could cause other diseases that spread from the animal to humans.

There is no evidence that cow-dung therapy can protect against COVID-19. Logically has already debunked this, quoting the World Health Organization, which issued a warning stating that the Coronavirus, like other viruses, could quickly spread through animal waste.

On June 7, 2021, India's union health minister Dr. Harsh Vardhan said that 28,252 cases of mucormycosis were registered in 28 states and Union Territories in the country. Eighty-six percent of these cases had a history of COVID-19, and 62.3 percent had a history of diabetes, India Today reported.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mucormycosis is a fungal infection caused by mucormycetes, fungi found in the soil and associated with decaying organic matter such as leaves, compost piles, and animal dung. Considering that people come in contact with these fungal spores every day, they are harmful to only those with weakened immune systems, the CDC adds.

There is a relationship between dung and mucor, says Dr. Digvijay Singh, head of the eye department at Narayana Hospital, Gurugram. Although the relationship between the use of cow dung and getting diagnosed with black fungus has not been established, Dr. Singh adds that "it seems logical to think that use of dung increases the risk of catching the mucor infection."

Although there is no established relationship between black fungus and cow dung, bacteria called mucormycetes found in animal dung could trigger Mucormycosis.

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