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CLAIM ID

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China confirms receiving fake ballot orders for the 2020 U.S. election.

Screenshots of an official holding a Chinese courier package during vote count are used misleadingly. China has not confirmed receiving such orders.

Screenshots of an official holding a Chinese courier package during vote count are used misleadingly. China has not confirmed receiving such orders.A picture of an election official holding a courier package delivered by S.F. Express, a Chinese delivery company, at a ballot count has gone viral. The image is used to falsely claim that it is evidence of Chinese involvement in the U.S. Presidential election because only the United States Postal Service(USPS) could return all mail-in ballots.

However, international delivery services, including Chinese delivery companies, were used by Americans overseas to send their votes. Americans residing abroad or overseas had returned their ballots using either local mail or express courier services. Overseas voters had many options for returning completed ballots. If U.S. citizens had a reliable mail service to the U.S., they could mail the vote with relevant international postage. They were even able to use professional courier services such as FedEx, DHL, or UPS at their own expense. The voters could use a "foreign mail system" and a "common carrier" to return ballots as per the Federal Voting Assistance Program.

We analyzed the image in the viral posts and found it to be a screenshot from a live stream of vote counts uploaded by USA Today. It showed ballot counters in Georgia on November 5, 2020. Georgia's statewide voting system implementation manager, Gabriel Sterling, said no voter fraud had occurred in Georgia during the election.

There are no reports of China confirming that it received orders for the fake ballots for the election. Also, there is no evidence of fraud or irregularities in the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

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