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CLAIM ID

5dd19b5c

An Italian billionaire killed himself from the top of one of his hotels in central Rome after his entire family died due to the coronavirus.

An old video of 2015 posted on Oma Oodua's Facebook account is circulated with a link to the current coronavirus outbreak.

An old video of 2015 posted on Oma Oodua's Facebook account is circulated with a link to the current coronavirus outbreak.A tweet by Azmath Sultan on 4 April 2020, states that an Italian billionaire committed suicide from the top of one of his hotels in central Rome after his entire family died due to coronavirus.

A reverse image search of one of the keyframes revealed that the video was posted by Oma Oodua on 10 August 2015. The video showed that a Ghanian woman jumped from the 40 storey building and killed herself.

Daily Mail article on 12 August 2015, states that a Ghanian pregnant woman devastated by the betrayal of her husband jumped from her apartment building. It also reported that there was confusion over the place where it exactly took place but most reports claiming a local police report confirmed it was in Ghana. Pulse, the Nigerian news site reported that the women took her own life when her family was on a visit to the country somewhere in Asia.

The same video was circulated in 2016 with the caption 'Suicide in the United States'.

Therefore, it is confirmed that an old video of 2015 is circulated from years with different caption and currently is linked to the coronavirus outbreak. The person who jumped from the building is not a man but a woman and the incident did not take place in central Rome.

The COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to a lot of potentially dangerous misinformation. For reliable advice on COVID-19 including symptoms, prevention and available treatment, please refer to the World Health Organisation or your national healthcare authority.

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