<img src="https://trc.taboola.com/1321591/log/3/unip?en=page_view" width="0" height="0" style="display:none">
Fact Check Library

Fact Check with Logically.

Download the Free App Today

false
false

CLAIM ID

5859719d

Dr. Li Wenliang claims that coffee has compounds that decrease the impact of the COVID-19 on the human body.

There is no scientific evidence available which suggests that coffee prevents or decreases the impact of the coronavirus.

There is no scientific evidence available which suggests that coffee prevents or decreases the impact of the coronavirus.A Whatsapp forward claims that before dying, Dr. Li Wenliang said that coffee has chemicals that can decrease the impact of COVID-19 on an individual. It also claims that the hospital staff in China is serving coffee to the patients three times a day. The chemicals supposedly present in coffee that can reduce the impact of COVID-19 are two types of methylxanthine: theobromine, and theophylline. Although these compounds are present in coffee, this claim is false, and there is no scientific evidence that suggests that coffee decreases the impact of the coronavirus.

Methylxanthines are a unique class of drugs that are derived from the purine base xanthine, which is produced naturally by both plants and animals. The methylxanthines, theophylline, and dyphylline are used in the treatment of airways obstruction caused by conditions such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, or emphysema.

The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that there are no drugs or other therapeutics presently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to cure or prevent COVID-19.

The COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to a lot of potentially dangerous misinformation. For reliable advice on COVID-19 including symptoms, prevention and available treatment, please refer to the World Health Organisation or your national healthcare authority.

Have a question or correction on one of our fact-checks?

If you think a claim has been misjudged or requires correction, please send us evidence to support your error claim. We will revisit our evidence and verdict and conduct additional research to verify new information.

Fact Check of the Day

misleading

397 children were diagnosed with heart inflammation after receiving Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine in U.S.