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CLAIM ID

27055ea8

Project Veritas has proven that the Democrats rigged the election.

There is no evidence which supports claims of widespread voter fraud in the Presidential election. Claims made by Project Veritas are unsubstantiated.Known for conducting "stings" intended to expose voter fraud and "liberal bias," Project Veritas and its founder James O’Keefe, have close associations with Republicans, including Donald Trump Jr., the president's son. Additionally, the Trump Foundation funded the group, giving two $10,000 donations in 2015. The right-wing group has routinely published edited videos that push its narrative on voter fraud during both the 2016 and 2020 presidential elections. In 2020, O’Keefe selectively edited footage of an operative asking for the ballot of a recently deceased person, omitting footage where the operative clarifies that he is asking for the ballot of the son of the deceased person. In another video, Project Veritas claimed non-citizens were voting; but the person they identified was a naturalized citizen. In September 2020, Project Veritas released a video alleging Representative Ilhan Omar’s campaign had collected ballots illegally from older Somali immigrants in a Minneapolis district. While it was proven that the video was published to intentionally spread falsehood, research by the University of Washington and Stanford University found that the video was probably part of a "coordinated disinformation effort", reported the New York Times. Roughly an hour after The Times published its investigation into Trump's tax returns, Mike Lindell, honorary chairman of Trump’s Minnesota campaign, tweeted a video saying that Project Veritas would publish an expose that evening. Trump Jr. tweeted the video minutes after its release — it was further retweeted by the president's war room account. The "timing and metadata of a Twitter post in which Trump’s son shared the video suggested that he might have known about it in advance," according to The Times' report. In October, it was reported that a man from Minnesota said that he was offered a $10,000 bribe to help a conservative group’s claims of voter fraud with alleged ties to Rep. Ilhan Omar. In response to the article, Project Veritas sued the New York Times, alleging that it was defamatory to call the group “deceptive.” The "bombshell" videos dropped by Project Veritas during the course of the 2020 presidential election have been edited in a way to show fraud, but they lack context, and claims made in those videos lack evidence. Furthermore, since the elections, multiple fact checking organizations, including Logically, have debunked several claims alleging voter fraud. We have found no evidence which suggests widespread voter fraud or that Democrats rigged the election.

There is no evidence which supports claims of widespread voter fraud in the Presidential election. Claims made by Project Veritas are unsubstantiated.Known for conducting "stings" intended to expose voter fraud and "liberal bias," Project Veritas and its founder James O’Keefe, have close associations with Republicans, including Donald Trump Jr., the president's son. Additionally, the Trump Foundation funded the group, giving two $10,000 donations in 2015.

The right-wing group has routinely published edited videos that push its narrative on voter fraud during both the 2016 and 2020 presidential elections. In 2020, O’Keefe selectively edited footage of an operative asking for the ballot of a recently deceased person, omitting footage where the operative clarifies that he is asking for the ballot of the son of the deceased person. In another video, Project Veritas claimed non-citizens were voting; but the person they identified was a naturalized citizen.

In September 2020, Project Veritas released a video alleging Representative Ilhan Omar’s campaign had collected ballots illegally from older Somali immigrants in a Minneapolis district. While it was proven that the video was published to intentionally spread falsehood, research by the University of Washington and Stanford University found that the video was probably part of a "coordinated disinformation effort", reported the New York Times. Roughly an hour after The Times published its investigation into Trump's tax returns, Mike Lindell, honorary chairman of Trump’s Minnesota campaign, tweeted a video saying that Project Veritas would publish an expose that evening. Trump Jr. tweeted the video minutes after its release — it was further retweeted by the president's war room account. The "timing and metadata of a Twitter post in which Trump’s son shared the video suggested that he might have known about it in advance," according to The Times' report. In October, it was reported that a man from Minnesota said that he was offered a $10,000 bribe to help a conservative group’s claims of voter fraud with alleged ties to Rep. Ilhan Omar.

In response to the article, Project Veritas sued the New York Times, alleging that it was defamatory to call the group “deceptive.”

The "bombshell" videos dropped by Project Veritas during the course of the 2020 presidential election have been edited in a way to show fraud, but they lack context, and claims made in those videos lack evidence.

Furthermore, since the elections, multiple fact checking organizations, including Logically, have debunked several claims alleging voter fraud. We have found no evidence which suggests widespread voter fraud or that Democrats rigged the election.

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